Corona Showcase, Education, Events, Media Literacy, News, Slideshow, Social Media

The Corona Multimedia Showcase

If we could ask children all around the world to create a media project that
would express what they were thinking and feeling during a pandemic, what
might they choose to tell us?

This question became the catalyst for a new and very exciting Action for
Media Education initiative, the International Corona Multimedia Showcase.
The Showcase was officially launched April15, 2020 with October 9, 2020 as
the deadline for entries.

We encourage you to visit the Showcase and view this festival celebrating the
talent thoughtfulness, humor and resilience of over 900 children and youth
age 3 through 19 and their families from 27countries and all continents (with
the exception of Antarctica).

Our special thanks to Dr. Tatyana Tsyrlina-Spady, our extraordinary
International Coordinator for the Showcase, our Showcase partners, the
International Janusz Korczak Association, Child Rights in Action and the
Northwest Center for Media Literacy, University of Washington and our many
showcase champions from around the world.

Note: We decided to briefly re-open the Showcase to accept entries over the
holiday season (December 15, 2020 – January 15, 2021). Although there was
limited publicity about this special Showcase addition, over 350 children and
youth and their families from 23 countries participated.

Seattle Times article about the Showcase:
https://www.seattletimes.com/life/corona-multimedia-showcase-seeks-to-
display-kids-creative-projects-made-during-the-pandemic/

 

Education, Fake News, News, Politics, Social Media, Technology

Media Literacy Project: Why should we trust journalists?

journalist-clipart-at-work-20.jpg

Professional journalists face more scrutiny in today’s crowded information marketplace because readers confuse them with bloggers and a cadre of online opinion scribes.

Journalism’s essence is a “discipline of verification,” according to Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel of the American Press Institute. This means that journalists pursue verification of facts as the first order of business. If the journalists do not follow these standards, their careers and reputations are on the line.

Readers should understand there are important differences between professional journalists and everyday bloggers. Journalists are held to higher standards. They are required to get specific training through journalism degrees and are held to employment standards that ensure they serve their audiences by providing relevant and reliable stories that matter to their communities.

Read more at The Free Press

By Kevin Krohn and Austin Moorhouse   July 14, 2017