A digital pill that can be tracked when swallowed was just approved by the FDA

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Monday that it had approved Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co Ltd’s Abilify MyCite, the first drug with a digital ingestion tracking system to be approved in the United States.

The product, which uses digital tracking to record if the medication was taken, has been approved for the treatment of schizophrenia, acute treatment of manic and mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder and for use as an add-on treatment for depression in adults, the FDA said.

The system sends a message from the pill’s sensor to a wearable patch, which then transmits the information to a mobile application, so that patients can track the ingestion of the medication on their smartphone.

Abilify MyCite is not approved to treat patients with dementia-related psychosis and contains a boxed warning alerting health care professionals that elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death.

The ingestible sensor used in Abilify MyCite was first permitted for marketing by the FDA in 2012.

This article is courtesy of Fortune.

A look at how this development has people worried about ethics can be read here in The New York Times.

FCC plans December vote to kill Net Neutrality rules

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission next month is planning a vote to kill Obama-era rules demanding fair treatment of web traffic and may decide to vacate the regulations altogether, according to people familiar with the plans.

 The move would reignite a years-long debate that has seen Republicans and broadband providers seeking to eliminate the rules, while Democrats and technology companies support them. The regulations passed in 2015 bar broadband providers such as AT&T Inc. and Comcast Corp. from interfering with web traffic sent by Google, Facebook Inc.and others.

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, chosen by President Donald Trump, in April proposed gutting the rules and asked for public reaction. The agency has taken in more than 22 million comments on the matter.

Pai plans to seek a vote in December, said two people who asked not to be identified because the matter hasn’t been made public. As the head of a Republican majority, he is likely to win a vote on whatever he proposes.

Read more at Bloomberg.

Video courtesy of Bloomberg.

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Speed and ease make “great” online experience

According to a new study from Cloud IQ, published by Marketing Charts, 47% of online shoppers in the US, UK and Australia deemed speed “critical” to a great online experience, with another 47% saying it’s “important.” Close behind 45% said it’s “critical” that the experience be seamless and easy, and 47% saying that it is “important”.

Other research from SUMO Heavy showed that US adults said the most important aspect of a great e-commerce website is its usability and functionality. Separately, research from the CMO Council said that for consumers, the most important attribute of a great customer experience was a fast response time to the customer’s needs and issues. And, in previous research from the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), fast response times and a simple purchasing process emerged as by far the leading elements of an ideal customer experience.

Read more at Media Post.

Data chart courtesy of Media Post.

Contributers To A Great Online Experience (Online Shoppers)
Online Experience

Critical

Important

Speed (can find and buy what I need quickly)

47%

47%

Seamless/Easy (Smooth, continuous and effortless experience across different channels)

45

47

Sense of Control (can search for answers, ask for help, updated, sense of being in control

39

51

Individualized (Treated as an individual and offered products, discounts, communications, based on specific preferences and needs)

27

55

Interactive, Engaging (Interesting, fun to use)

24

55

Proactive (Anticipated needs, provides timely offers, alerts and reminders)

21

52

Source: Published on Marketing Charts 11/17; Data Source Cloud IQ

How Silicon Valley plans to conquer the classroom

00BIGED2-superJumboThey call it the “Church Lane Hug.”

That is how educators at Church Lane Elementary Technology, a public school here, describe the protective two-armed way they teach students to carry their school-issued laptops.

Administrators at Baltimore County Public Schools, the 25th-largest public school system in the United States, have embraced the laptops as well, as part of one of the nation’s most ambitious classroom technology makeovers. In 2014, the district committed more than $200 million for HP laptops, and it is spending millions of dollars on math, science and language software. Its vendors visit classrooms. Some schoolchildren have been featured in tech-company promotional videos.

And Silicon Valley has embraced the school district right back.

HP has promoted the district as a model to follow in places as diverse as New York City and Rwanda. Daly Computers, which supplied the HP laptops, donated $30,000 this year to the district’s education foundation. Baltimore County schools’ top officials have traveled widely to industry-funded education events, with travel sometimes paid for by industry-sponsored groups.

Read more at The New York Times.

Image courtesy of The New York Times.

Media Literacy Week Champion: Marko Liias

In honor of Media Literacy Week, November 6-10, each day we will recognize a key figure in the field of media literacy here in Washington state.

Sen. Marko Liias, D-21

Senator Marko Liias represents the communities of the 21st Legislative District, which includes neighborhoods in Edmonds, Everett, Lynnwood, and Mukilteo. The 2017 Legislative Session was his 10th session serving in Olympia.

Marko was born at Stevens Hospital in Edmonds in 1981 and graduated from Kamiak High School in Mukilteo. After high school, Marko worked his way through college with the help of student loans and scholarships, and received his bachelor’s degree from Georgetown University. He is currently completing his graduate degree in Public Administration at the Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs at the University of Washington.

In 2005, he was elected to the Mukilteo City Council, where he served for two years. During his time on the city council, Marko was a champion of parks and open space, and led the council in setting aside $1 million for new parkland. He also sponsored the city’s first biofuels ordinance, to promote the use of biofuels at local service stations.

In January 2008, Marko was appointed to the House of Representatives. Throughout his service in the Legislature, Marko has focused on policies to advance a strong economy based on good-paying jobs, a safe and quality education system, and a balanced transportation system that serves the whole community.

It was Marko’s work on bullying in schools that led him to champion media literacy in Washington. After learning about Action for Media Literacy’s mission from his constituent Claire Beach, he sponsored Senate Bill 6273 that directed the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction to convene a workgroup to review best practices and make policy recommendations. SB 6273 has become a roadmap for other states across the country to push for media literacy policy. During the 2017 session Marko and AME worked together to pass Senate Bill 5449 which implemented some of the policy recommendations from the OSPI workgroup.

In addition to his service in the Legislature, Sen. Liias works in our community as a volunteer with the Kamiak High School Debate Program, as a board member of the Seattle Repertory Theatre, and as a member of the Transportation Choices Coalition.

Media Literacy Week Champion: Barbara Johnson and Marilyn Cohen

In honor of Media Literacy Week, November 6-10, each day we will recognize a key figure in the field of media literacy here in Washington state.

Barbara

Barbara Johnson has been working for the last 26 years as a program operations specialist at NW Center for Excellence in Media Literacy, College of Education UW. The center develops media literacy curriculum as a hook to address teen health issues. As part of the center staff she has traveled the state of Washington doing focus work groups with parents, teachers and students to develop effective curriculum that target a wide-range of health issues. The project has trained teachers, community educators and youth to be facilitators in media literacy curriculum in school and community programs as well as organized statewide media literacy workshops and conferences. She is a founding member and treasurer of Action for Media Education.

mcohenMarilyn Cohen, AME’s Executive Director, was one of the founding members. Marilyn has been actively involved in media literacy education since the early 90s. She also currently serves as the Director of the Northwest Center for Excellence in Media Literacy, College of Education, University of Washington. Through her work with AME and the NW Center, she has taken a leadership role in organizing conferences and workshops designed to grow the media literacy movement particularly in the Pacific Northwest. In addition, in 2007 she assumed leadership in organizing the nation’s first Media Literacy Research Summit, sponsored by the organization now known as the National Association for Media Literacy Education. Marilyn has also written a number of media literacy-based curriculum materials that have been implemented widely by schools as well as by a broad range of groups and organizations serving young people across the nation.

Media Literacy Week Champion: Dennis Small

In honor of Media Literacy Week, November 6-10, each day we will recognize a key figure in the field of media literacy here in Washington state.

DSmall-headshot_finalDennis Small is the Educational Technology Director at the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, where he has worked since 1989. Among his roles and responsibilities at OSPI are promoting the state educational technology standards, assistance for district E-rate applications, assisting schools in the move to online assessment, advocating for high-speed bandwidth for schools, improving technology infrastructure equitably through the Computers 4 Kids Program, and supporting the K-12 educational use of the K-20 Network. He has also been actively involved in implementing SSB 6273 (2016) and SSB 5449 (2017) (Digital Citizenship and Media Literacy resources here), promoting Digital Citizenship, Media Literacy, and Internet Safety in Washington schools.

Dennis received a B.A. in Music and a B.S. in Mathematical Sciences from Stanford University (1973-1977), and an M.A. in Education from Stanford (1978). Prior to working at OSPI, he was a music, computer, and math teacher at Charles Wright Academy in Tacoma from 1978-1989.

Media Literacy Week Champion: Linda Kennedy and Claire Beach

In honor of Media Literacy Week, November 6-10, each day we will recognize a key figure in the field of media literacy here in Washington state.

imageLinda Kennedy is the principal in the media education and consulting firm of LK Media. LK Media specializes in teaching media literacy to parents, teachers, students, caregivers, childcare providers, and community organizations. In addition, LK Media works with companies attempting to forge a media image and garner positive news coverage. Ms. Kennedy has more than 25 years of experience in the media. She started her career as a radio and television reporter in Omaha, Nebraska and after a short stint in Portland, Oregon moved to Seattle to become an a reporter, anchor, and producer at KING 5 News. Her “beats: included education, the environment, medicine, and consumer issues. After leaving KING, she directed internal and external communications for Public Health – Seattle & King County. Linda has been an AME board member since 1991, when the organization was still Foundation for Family Television. Anyone who knows her will tell you she can find a way to work media literacy into almost any conversation.

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For over 30 years Claire Beach has worked with young people in a variety of settings. She has managed youth programs, been a youth street worker for inner city teens, and taught video and media literacy skills to hundreds of young people. An award-winning documentary filmmaker, she taught video production and media literacy in public schools for 15 years. She is a past president of Action for Media Education and is now a board member of the national organization Media Literacy Now which advocates for media literacy legislation throughout the United States.

Media Literacy Week Champions: Nick Pernisco

In honor of Media Literacy Week, November 6-10, each day we will recognize a key figure in the field of media literacy here in Washington state.

nperniscoMedia Studies Professor Nick Pernisco teaches online courses in media literacy for Santa Monica College. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Radio-TV-Film and a master’s degree in Mass Communications, both from California State University, Northridge.

He has been a media professional since 1996, beginning as a freelance media producer and later working in radio advertising, music production, voice and screen acting, and film production. In 2005, Nick founded Understand Media, a media literacy website containing original articles, podcasts, videos, lesson plans, and discussion forums. Also in 2005, he founded Carmelina Films, a film production company dedicated to producing socially-relevant video content.

He is a board member at Action for Media Education, and participated in the effort to pass media literacy legislation in Washington State in 2016. Nick’s book, Practical Media Literacy, was released in 2015.

AME gets a refresh

We have decided after many years to begin a needed refresh on our logo and overall design elements. We’d like to debut our new logo then to kickoff this process.

Below is the newest face of AME. A beautiful nod to cameras and photography, this logo will now be on all our materials going forward, and will replace our older logos, also below.

Thank you to everyone for your continued support. We look forward to this refresh of logos and colors while continuing to unify all of you in efforts to promote, educate and advocate for media literacy in Washington State.

 

Learning to spot fake news: Start with a gut check

Which of these statements seems more trustworthy to you?

1) Americans are drowning in a tsunami of ignorance! There is a conspiracy at the highest levels to replace all knowledge with propaganda and disinformation.

2) A recent Stanford University report found that more than 80 percent of middle schoolers didn’t understand that the phrase “sponsored content” meant “advertising.”

For most of the NPR audience, this shouldn’t be a tough question. The first sentence is a florid, mislabeled statement of opinion with an unverifiable, overgeneralized, ideological claim (“conspiracy at the highest levels”).

The second is more measured in tone and limited in scope. And, it has a link that goes straight to the original source: a press release from a reputable university.

But these days, statements of all stripes are bombarding us via broadcast and social media. The trick is classifying them correctly before we swallow them ourselves, much less before we hit “Like,” “Share” or “Retweet.”

And that is the goal of an educational initiative that will be adopted by 10 universities across the country this spring.

Read more at NPR.

Image courtesy of NPR.

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Greed and the attack on American newspapers

Back in 2011, a reclusive Wall Street tycoon began purchasing and then destroying hometown newspapers across America. His henchmen — executives with no experience in the news business — laid off hundreds of journalists and other news workers. They closed or radically downsized such venerable papers as the Oakland Tribune, the San Jose Mercury News, the St. Paul Pioneer Press and The Denver Post. At the Mercury News, the newspaper’s printing press was literally dismantled and carted away, which one staff reporter likened to “watching a heart being ripped out.”

The tycoon is Randall D. Smith, founder and chief of investments at Alden Global Capital, which manages $2 billion worth of assets, including the Digital First Media newspaper chain. He is what is known on Wall Street as a “vulture capitalist.” Or, as the company puts it, Smith invests in “distress.”

“Distress” is an apt word for the current state of America’s newspapers, and Smith isn’t the only financial mogul gobbling them up. On Sept. 4, the New York Daily News was purchased by Tronc, the media conglomerate whose majority shareholder is Michael W. Ferro, the business magnate who founded the investment firm Merrick Ventures.

Read more at The Seattle Times.

Media literacy in Massachusetts

mmlMASS Media Literacy (MLL) is doing great work in the media literacy field. Check out their website to see what they’ve been up to.

 

Their website says:

Our mission is to ensure that all Massachusetts students are taught the critical thinking skills needed to engage with media as active and informed participants in the 21st century.

Our vision: through education, research, advocacy and networking, we bring comprehensive Media Literacy education to Massachusetts’ schools and communities.

Learn more about them at their website http://www.massmedialiteracy.org.

It’s surprisingly easy for anyone to buy ads that track location and app usage, study says

app usageResearchers at the University of Washington have found a way to track a person’s location and app use through serving ads on mobile apps. The result opens the door for significant privacy invasions through the app-based advertising system.

The researchers obtained the information by purchasing a series of ads targeted to specific locations and apps, then checking which mobile subscribers fit the targeting. In experiments conducted on Android devices, the team was able to pinpoint a person’s location within eight meters through a targeted ad. They tested ads on 10 different apps, including Grindr, Imgur, Words with Friends, and Talkatone, all using widely available ad networks.

By serving ad content to a user’s apps, the ad buyers could learn what apps the user has installed. That information could be sensitive, revealing a user’s sexual orientation or religious affiliation. For instance, ads served on Grindr will tell the ad buyer that the user has Grindr installed.

Read more at The Verge.

Image courtesy of The Verge.

Success! Mattel announced that they were canceling the release of Aristotle

From Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood:

On October 4, Mattel announced that they were canceling the release of Aristotle. Thank you to the thousands of parents, caregivers, and experts who spoke out in support of kids’ privacy and well-being! We commend Mattel for doing the right thing and putting kids first. 

From The New York Times:

Mattel announced on Wednesday that it was canceling plans to bring to market a smart device called Aristotle, which was aimed at children from infancy to adolescence and was set to hit stores in 2018. The decision came after child advocacy groups, lawmakers and parents raised concerns about the impact the artificial intelligence device could have had on children’s privacy, development and well-being.

A petition asking Mattel not to release Aristotle, started in May by the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood and the Story of Stuff Project, garnered more than 15,000 signatures and argued that babies and older children shouldn’t be encouraged to form bonds with data-collecting devices.

Read more at The New York Times.

Great educator activity: Video mash-ups with Google Slides

Mash-Ups are a fun and popular way to express creativity whether you are combining different styles of music, or art, or memes, or such. Mash-ups can also be educational when the creator uses the two items to explain or express an idea, or for one of the items to complement or expand on the other.

One fun way to students to try this out is by using Google Slides to mash-up videos. Google Slides makes it easy to insert videos from either YouTube or Google Drive. Slides allows you to adjust your video options so that your videos automatically play when the slideshow runs. The end results is a presentation with two videos that play at the same time.

This could be used in several creative projects such as:

  • Adding music or popular songs to famous historical speeches, or science videos, or scenes from story.
  • Or having one video explain a concept, while the other shows examples or demonstrations of that idea.
  • Or the videos could be used to show contrast, by playing two videos that demonstrate different processes or ideas or time periods or such.

See below for directions on how students can do this activity, along with a free template they can copy and use, as well as an example mash-up to show what a final product might look like.

Read more at Control Alt Achieve.

Oprah’s head, Ann-Margaret’s body: A brief history of pre-Photoshop fakery

Aug1989-OprahIn 1989, TV Guide put television’s celebrity-du-jour, Oprah Winfrey, on its cover, perching her upon a pile of money. The picture was exactly the kind of thing that tends to sell magazines on newsstands and in supermarket check-out lines: It was friendly, it was saucy, it was sparkly. The only problem was that it wasn’t, actually, Oprah. TV Guide had taken a picture of the talk show host’s face … and grafted it onto the body of ’60s star Ann-Margaret. The magazine had asked the permission of neither woman before it published its odd bit of Frankensteinery.

Photoshop was invented in 1987 and widely distributed, for the first time, in 1990; the TV Guide debacle would mark one of the last times that art editors had to physically splice images to create new manipulations. But a lack of Photoshop, while the software ushered in our present age of doctored photography, did nothing to stop would-be fakers from their, er, fauxtography.

Read more at The Atlantic.

Image courtesy of The Atlantic.

AOL says farewell to AIM, its popular instant messenger service, after 20 years

1006-aim-coming-to-an-end-aol-instant-messenger-twitter-4AOL has posted their final away message in what could be considered the end of an era.

The tech company announced Friday it would be discontinuing its pioneering Instant Messenger chat platform after 20 years of service.

AOL’s website posted the statement saying AOL Instant Messenger (AIM) would be shutting down on Dec. 15. AOL said it was ending the service to better focus on “building the next generation of iconic brands and life-changing products.”

After Dec. 15., AIM users won’t be able to sign into their accounts.

The statement also paid homage to its success in the late 1990s, including being referenced in HBO’s “Sex and the City” and the 1998 film, “You’ve Got Mail.”

Read more at Fox News.

Image courtesy of Fox News.

Global Media and Information Literacy Week 2017, Oct 25 – Nov 1

UNESCO is hosting its sixth annual Global Media and Information Literacy Week October 25 through November 1. Activities and the feature conference are important opportunities for stakeholders globally to celebrate the progress achieved towards the process of “MIL for all”. Global MIL Week also enables connections and sharing of creative projects, the latest research, new ideas, and information across countries and stakeholders involved in MIL, and in print, screen-based and digital media.

The Global MIL Week 2017 highlights include local and regional activities around the world as well as its feature event, namely the Seventh Media and Information Literacy and Intercultural Dialogue (MILID) Conference. The feature conference will be hosted by the University of the West Indies, and will take place from 24 to 27 October, 2017 in Kingston, Jamaica.

Learn more at the UNESCO MIL website.

Image courtesy of UNESCO.

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Invitation to free Symposium and Training on Online Student Safety, Nov. 2 at ESD 105 in Yakima, WA

Educational Service District 105, in Yakima, WA, will be hosting a free symposium and training on online student safety. It will also feature national cyber safety partners including Common Sense Media and Gaggle.

The Symposium on Student Safety, a free symposium for school and district administrators, cabinet members and other educators responsible for student online safety, will deal with bullying, harassment, suicide, child pornography and violence and other online issues.

The event is Thursday, November 2 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Lunch will be provided. Seats are limited so register soon.

To register for the event, click here.

For more information about the symposium visit www.studentsafetysymposium.com.

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New resource for parents from NAMLE

NAMLE is encouraging people to check out their new booklet. It was put out by a group called Trend Micro and is titled called Building Healthy Relationships with Media. It looks like it will be a good resource for parents.

Click on the image below for more information.

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Fake news, fake data

Some people have called 2016 the year of fake news. False articles with gripping headlines about everything from the demise of Taco Bell to Hillary Clinton’s selling weapons to ISIS took social media by storm. Millions of people clicked, read, and shared these stories that had no basis in fact.

But it’s not just the articles that can be false. Many fake news sites use bad data or misleading graphs. Even mainstream media outlets are guilty of creating graphs that exaggerate or understate results. Bad graphs and inaccurate data can cause readers to draw the wrong conclusions.

These invented stories supported by bad data are part of a new trend. Fake news websites—many with official-sounding names and professional-looking designs—are multiplying. Experts warn that fake news sites are weakening the public’s ability to distinguish between fact and fiction.

Read more at Scholastic.

Image courtesy of Scholastic.

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Fake news fills information void in Las Vegas shooting

As law enforcement and news organizations raced to piece together what happened during the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history Sunday night in Las Vegas, web denizens less wedded to the truth rushed in to provide details of their own—which quickly went viral.

Links to the 4chan website that falsely identified the shooter and called him a leftist and Democratic supporter were showing up on the top of Google search results, according to tweets by Buzzfeed News reporter Ryan Broderick.

Read more at Ad Age.

Image courtesy of Ad Age.

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Google extends digital literacy training to teachers

Digital citizenship has stepped into the forefront of a modern-day education. Experts indicate that as schools roll out tech, they also need to be rolling out digital citizenship education.

Tech giant Google heeded that call and partnered with experts to launch Be Internet Awesome, an interactive campaign that educates students on how best to act on the internet.

One part of this Google campaign is Interland, a game that has students travel an imaginary world where they need to fight hackers, phishers, oversharers and bullies with digital citizenship skills. While game-based learning can be effective, educators also need to be armed with skills to teach their students to be citizens of the web.

This month, Google extended its Be Internet Awesome program to include a free online training course to help educators establish foundational skills needed to teach their students to have a safe and positive experience online.

Read more at Ed Tech.